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Whitney Cerak, Hospital and Medical Center

July 27, 2010 by staff 

Whitney CerakWhitney Cerak, PHOENIX (AP) – The father of one of the women incorrectly after a deadly traffic crash Arizona said the problem resulted from a communication failure at a hospital in Phoenix.

Frank Cantu on Monday, the hospital correctly the woman in critical condition after 18 July Crash – but then reported the wrong family identified.

He said St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center uses the information from the families that he was determined 19-year-old Abby Guerra, who survived the wreck, not his 21-year-old daughter, Marlena Cantu. But he said hospital staff accidentally came to him and said the woman was in hospital his daughter.

“They talked to the wrong person,” he said.

Frank Cantu said Guerra was then assumed that the woman who died at the scene.

A spokesman for the St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center will not immediately return a call seeking comment Monday night.

Earlier Wednesday, the hospital said Vice President for External Affairs, Suzanne Pfister, it was difficult, the woman admitted to hospital because she was seriously injured and the doctors were fighting for their lives was identified.

“The hospital has no dental records, fingerprints, also not in the middle of a trauma situation, because the overwhelming focus is on saving the patient’s life,” Pfister said at a press conference.

She said that the hospital identifies the patient as Cantu to ask family members about identifiable marks, scars or broken bones. She declined to say which features were used in the identification by referring to the Guerra family request privacy.

Sgt Kevin Wood, Arizona Department of Public Safety spokesman added that officers and hospital staff spent about five hours trying to identify the patient.

Frank Cantu said the family was asked for trains, easily identify the young women and Guerra’s mother said her daughter had an identifiable mark on the chest.

Cantu said a hospital worker went to check the patient and returned to Cantu and told him the patient was his daughter.

Guerra family had told her daughter, died at the scene, he said.

The mistake was only discovered on Saturday – after the Maricopa County Medical Examiner’s Office completed an autopsy and was looking for a comparison of women dental records.

Cantu and Guerra were among a group of five friends from Ironwood High School in Glendale, near Phoenix, who returned from Disneyland, when the sport utility vehicle in which they had a tire exploded. The driver lost control and the SUV rolled several times.

One of the five – 20-year-old Tyler Parker – was to be taken St. Joseph’s, where he died the next day. A woman believed to be Cantu and one other person suffered head injuries and were taken to the St. Joseph’s. Another woman, probably Guerra, was dead at the scene.

Guerra family spent the last week of planning her funeral. The family and teammates from Guerra’s University of Evansville in Indiana football team rushed to her bedside after learning of the mix-up.

Frank Cantu said earlier Monday he is not guilty for what someone has not happened, but he hopes something can be done to prevent similar mistakes from happening in the future.

“We want to find a better solution like,” he said. ‘We do not want this to happen to someone else. ”

A similar ID mix-up after a crash in 2006 traffic figures in Indiana led by two women, a new law in this state. It requires coroners to use one of the four methods to identify a dead p
PHOENIX (AP) – The father of one of the women incorrectly after a deadly traffic crash Arizona said the problem resulted from a communication failure at a hospital in Phoenix.

Frank Cantu on Monday, the hospital correctly the woman in critical condition after 18 July crash – reported but then the wrong family identified.

He said St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center uses the information from the families that he was determined 19-year-old Abby Guerra, who survived the wreck, not his 21-year-old daughter, Marlena Cantu. But he said hospital staff accidentally came to him and said the woman was in hospital his daughter.

“They talked to the wrong person,” he said.

Frank Cantu said Guerra was then assumed that the woman who died at the scene.

A spokesman for the St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center is not immediately return a call seeking comment Monday night.

Earlier Monday, said hospital Vice President for External Affairs, Suzanne Pfister, it was difficult, the woman admitted to the hospital because she was seriously injured and the doctors were fighting to get her life was identified.

“The hospital has no dental records, fingerprints, also not in the midst of a trauma situation, because the overwhelming focus is on saving the patient’s life,” Pfister said at a press conference.

She said that the hospital identifies the patient as Cantu to ask family members about identifiable marks, scars or broken bones. She declined to say which features were used in the identification by referring to the Guerra family request privacy.

Sgt Kevin Wood, Arizona Department of Public Safety spokesman added that officers and hospital staff spent about five hours trying to identify the patient.

Cantu, Frank said the family was asked for trains, easily identify the young women and Guerra’s mother said her daughter had an identifiable mark on the chest.

Cantu said a hospital worker went to check the patient and returned to Cantu and told him that the patient was his daughter.

Guerra family had told her daughter, died at the scene, he said.

The mistake was only discovered on Saturday – after the Maricopa County Medical Examiner’s Office completed an autopsy and was looking for a comparison of women dental records.

Cantu and Guerra belonged to a group of five friends from Ironwood High School in Glendale, near Phoenix, who returned from Disneyland, when the sport utility vehicle in which they had a tire explode. The driver lost control and the SUV rolled several times.

One of the five – 20-year-old Tyler Parker – was to be taken St. Joseph’s, where he died the next day. A woman believed to be Cantu and one other person suffered head injuries and were taken to the St. Joseph’s. Another woman, probably Guerra, was dead at the scene.

Guerra family spent the last week of planning her funeral. The family and teammates from Guerra’s University of Evansville in Indiana football team rushed to her bedside after learning of the mix-up.

Frank Cantu said earlier Monday he is not guilty for what someone has not happened, but he hopes something can be done to prevent similar mistakes from happening in the future.

“We want to find a better solution like,” he said. “We do not want this to happen to someone else.”

A similar ID mix-up after a crash in 2006 traffic figures in Indiana led by two women, a new law in this state. It requires coroners to use one of four methods to identify a dead person: fingerprints, DNAanlysis, dental records or positive identification by an immediate family member.

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