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Veteran Actor Dies ‘Bill Hunter’

May 22, 2011 by Post Team 

Veteran Actor Dies 'Bill Hunter'Veteran Actor Dies ‘Bill Hunter’, Iconic Australian actor Bill Hunter, who starred in some of the country’s most popular films, has died of cancer at age 71, his manager said Sunday. The screen veteran, who made a name for him playing the archetypal rough Australian guy with a heart of gold, died surrounded by family and friends at a hospice in Melbourne on Saturday. “Bill was very dear, a gentleman, an inspiration to fellow actors, and a rogue officer,” said coach Mark Morrissey said. “It was an excellent actor, a true storyteller and a great friend. He will be sorely missed.” Hunter credits read like a history of Australian film and television, appearing in over 100 productions big and small screen. During a career spanning 50 years worked with the majority of Australia’s biggest names, including Nicole Kidman, Mel Gibson, Hugo Weaving, Hugh Jackman and Toni Collette.

The list also extends to the country’s leading directors such as Stephen Elliott, Peter Weir, PJ Hogan and Phillip Noyce. He has a taste for acting as an uncredited extra in Gregory Peck and Ava Gardner on the beach in 1959 and never looked back. Hunter starred as the largest Barton Gibson Weir “Gallipoli”, played the meddling Barry Fife in “Strictly Dancing” by Baz Luhrmann and starring the father of Collette in “Muriel’s Wedding.”

Perhaps his best-known role was the friendly mechanic inner Bob Hogan “Priscilla, Queen of the Desert”, starring alongside Terence Stamp, Guy Pearce and tissue.

More recently, he worked on “Finding Nemo”, “Crackerjack” and Luhrmann’s “Australia.”

Born in Ballarat in the state of Victoria in 1940, Hunter began his acting career on television in the 1960′s and 70′s, with roles in “Doctor Who”, “Skippy” and even “Dynasty.”

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