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SAT Cheating

October 1, 2011 by USA Post 

SAT CheatingSAT Cheating, Six students have been charged with misdemeanors and seventh faces more serious felony charges after an alleged ring of SAT-deception was discovered by officials recently in Great Neck North, New York, according to The New York Times .

A 19-year-old Samuel Eshaghoff, was arrested Tuesday for allegedly taking money from current and former students who attend Great Neck North High School in Long Island and using fake IDs to take their SAT exams. Eshaghoff is a student at Emory University in Atlanta and flew home says to take the exam after you have paid and anywhere between 1,500 and 2,500 and reported the Christian Science Monitor. Eshaghoff 2010 was a graduate of Great Neck North High School.

Of course, the crux of the SAT is the ring that the test taker needed for high scores at home – this, apparently, was not a problem. The Christian Science Monitor reported that Eshaghoff allegedly obtained between 2140 and 2220 in each of the tests Sat maximum score on the SAT test is 2400.

The Great Neck area is considered a wealthy community, according to The Christian Science Monitor, and a ring trap SAT course happened there, pointing to the pressure to succeed.

Robert Schaeffer, spokesman for the National Center for Fair and Open Testing, located in Boston, told The Christian Science Monitor that the issue is an example “the arms race Sat takes place, especially in rich nations where children think they are failures unless going to a school where their parents would be proud to put the sticker on the window behind him. ”

The alleged network was discovered after the power to hear rumors at school about students pay someone to take the SAT. School officials made a list of tested students outside the school district and the resulting comparison with average SAT, said The New York Times. Theanlysis revealed six students with notes in the low to mid-B, but the results of the SAT in the 97th percentile. The Educational Testing Service, which administers the test, ananlysis of writing in these tests and determined that a student had taken everyone.

The district attorney’s office in Nassau County, where it is in Great Neck North High School, is the part that the charges against him and other students Eshaghoff. However, a prosecutor with the district attorney’s office believes that participation in the alleged fraud ring SAT may be more widespread.

“I think it is more systematic than just north of Great Neck,” Kathleen Rice, Nassau County DA, he reportedly told The New York Times.

However, according to Tom Wing, a spokesman for ETS, colleges and universities are not alerted when a student is suspected of cheating. This is due to confidentiality laws that apply to protect minors. However, the results can be removed when the wrongdoing is suspected.

Eshaghoff faces up to four years in prison in connection with charges of criminal impersonation, falsification of business records and conspiracy to commit fraud, according to The Washington Post. He posted bail and 500 and pleaded not guilty. The other students were released without having to post any bail. Four of the students is reported now in college, while the other two are still in high school.

It remains to be seen whether these students attend schools that take no action to avoid behaviors such assumptions.

“The real question is, as a society is what you really want to take this seriously or just refer to that when people unlucky enough to get caught,” said Michael Josephson, founder and president of Josephson Institute of Ethics at The Christian Science Monitor. “We are raising the next generation of corporate villains and pirates if not reinforced with vigor and consistency of the absolute essence of integrity.”

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