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Mississippi River Map

May 11, 2011 by USA Post 

Mississippi River MapMississippi River Map, The Mississippi River crested in Memphis in about 48 feet on Tuesday, dropping inches below its record. Is expected to soak lowland areas with water for the next few weeks.

The flooding, which has already parts of Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee and Arkansas under water, is one of the largest and most damaging time along the River. Authorities say they are confident the levees that are at the moment, and are now preparing for the massive cleanup that awaits.

As communities continue to deal with the effects of flooding of the Mississippi, here are the answers to your most pressing questions of flooding.

The Mississippi River crested in Memphis in about 48 feet on Tuesday, dropping inches below its record. Is expected to soak lowland areas with water for the next few weeks.

The flooding, which has already parts of Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee and Arkansas under water, is one of the largest and most damaging time along the River. Authorities say they are confident the levees that are at the moment, and are now preparing for the massive cleanup that awaits.

As communities continue to deal with the effects of flooding of the Mississippi, here are the answers to your most pressing questions of flooding.

If the Morganza floodway channel does not open to 300.000 cubic feet per second of water from the Mississippi River at the Atchafalaya River basin, additional water could cause the levees were not along the river from Morganza Plaquemines, including all those of the New Orleans area, resulting in up to 25 feet of floodwater, according to a map to state officials by the Army Corps of Engineers on Tuesday.
The worst case obtained by The Times-Picayune is part of risk assessment this week by officials of the Corps to support the opening of the channel. The combination of water from the river and Old River Control Structure Morganza just upstream of discharge into the Atchafalaya Basin flood a large swathe of largely uninhabited land.

They also threaten Morgan City, Houma and several smaller communities.

Ironically, much of the Atchafalaya Basin flood even if the dump does not open, according to the new map, as the old river control structure is sending twice as much water in the basin of the Mississippi as it does normally. Meanwhile, the river still above the channel structure Morganza relatively low, even if not open, and several other levee failures could occur between Morganza and Baton Rouge.

Corps Maj. Gen. Michael Walsh, president of the Mississippi River Commission and the commander of all body districts along the river, has hinted to approve the opening of the Morganza Floodway sometime between Friday and Tuesday. It was then that the rate of water moving past Red River Landing, across the Louisiana State Prison in Angola, will reach 1.5 million cubic feet per second, which is the trigger for the official opening of the spillway.

During a news conference in Baton Rouge, Gov. Bobby Jindal said he expected Walsh to order the opening of the landfill. He urged residents in affected areas to prepare for evacuations, if called by their local elected leaders.

The National Weather Service has predicted that, at its peak, 1.9 million cubic feet per second of water flow past the Red River landing, if the channel does not open.

That would lead to a crest of 19.5 feet at the Carrollton gauge in New Orleans, which is 2.5 meters above the official flood level and only 6 inches below the top of retaining walls.

The new map body assumes that high water could lead to multiple failures of earth dams, embankments and other structures along the river, said Walter Baumy, chief engineer for the New Orleans Corps office.

Record water levels could also cause a dramatic disruption to businesses in the Port of New Orleans and elsewhere along the river in the New Orleans area, said Bob Turner, executive director of the Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection East.

“With a stage in Carrollton at 19.5 meters, would have to close most of the gates of the dam along the Mississippi River within our jurisdiction,” he said. “The harbor Public Belt Railroad, recreation areas such as the Audubon Aquarium and Butterfly Park would shut down.”

More significant, however, unknown effects on the levees, Turner said.

“We have a good bit of experience in dealing with the leakage is reduced and the sand, soil saturation conditions when river levels are about 17 feet,” he said. “Once the river gets more than 17.5 feet, I know we are experienced in dealing with the same problems. Filtration and reduces the sand, that uncertainty gives us some concern. My instinct is that if it increases, it will be more difficult to keep things under control. ”

Even if the river does not go much over 17 feet in New Orleans, a level reached at noon on Tuesday, officials of the dam was keeping watch carefully when the river begins to drop, now not expected until mid-June, Turner said.

“If the river begins to fall rapidly, there could be incidents in the Slide saturated levees in the river,” he said.

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