Medieval Knights PTSD

December 22, 2011 by staff 

Medieval Knights PTSDMedieval Knights PTSD, In movies, medieval knights are portrayed as courageous and loyal heroes who will fight to the death without fear or regret. In reality, the lives of knights were filled with a litany of stresses much like those that modern soldiers deal with.

They were often sleep-deprived, exhausted and malnourished. They slept outside on hard ground, fully exposed to whatever weather befell them. And their lives were full of horror and carnage as they regularly killed other men and watched their friends die.

Faced with the trauma inherent in a life of combat, according to a new look at ancient texts, medieval knights sometimes struggled with despair, fear, powerlessness and delusions. Some may have even suffered from post-traumatic stress or related disorders, argues a Danish researcher, just as their modern-day counterparts do.

The research strives to add a dose of humanity to our understanding of knights, who are often considered cold and heartless killers.

“As a medievalist, it’s a bit irritating to hear people say that the Middle Ages were just populated by brutal and mindless thugs who just wallowed in warfare,” said Thomas Heeb?ll-Holm, a medieval historian at the University of Copenhagen. “I’m going for a nuanced picture of humans that lived in the past. They were people just like you and me, as far as we can tell.”

Ever since the war in Vietnam, there has been a growing recognition that the terrors of battle, torture, t*rror*sm and other horrific experiences can result in a type of severe psychological distress now known as PTSD. To be diagnosed with the disorder, people must suffer from uncontrollable and intense stress for at least a month after a horrifying event. Symptoms can include flashbacks, nightmares, depression and hyperactivity.

When soldiers go to war in modern times, Heeb?ll-Holm said, psychologists now recognize that the stresses they encounter can lower their psychological resistance until they finally succumb to anxiety disorders. Since medieval knights faced as many and possibly more hardships than modern soldiers do, he wondered if he might be able to find references to signs of trauma in warriors who fought during the Middle Ages.

In addition to other documents, Heeb?ll-Holm focused on three texts written by a 14th-century French knight named Geoffroi de Charny, who was also a diplomat and trusted adviser to King John II.

No one knows for sure why Charny wrote the documents, whose translated titles included “The Book of Chivalry” and “Questions Concerning the Joust, Tournaments and War.” The most popular theory is that they were part of an effort to create an ideological program for the royal French chivalric order that would rival the British equivalent.

Though many of these texts have been thoroughlyanlyzed already, Heeb?ll-Holm was the first to look between the lines through the lens of modern military psychology. And while it’s hard to ever completely understand a culture that was so very different (and far more religious) than our own, Heeb?ll-Holm found a number of examples that would suggest at least the potential for trauma in medieval knights.

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