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Les Miserables Lyrics

January 29, 2011 by Post Team 

Les Miserables Lyrics, The 25th anniversary concert of Les Miserables, which was presented to October at the London O2 Arena 3, 2010, will arrive on Blu-ray next month.

Universal Studios Home Entertainment will release the DVD on Feb. 22, according www.blu-ray.com. No special features have been announced.

It has music by Claude-Michel Sch? Nberg, lyrics by Herbert Kretzmer, original French text by Alain Boublil and Jean-Marc Natel and additional material by James Fenton. The original London production of 1985, The Miz was adapted and directed by Nunn and Caird. The production of new birthday 25 and O2 are directed by Laurence Connor and James Powell and designed by Matt Kinley.
Some musicals age better than others, and Les Miserables is one of the timeless. Yet, theater styles, preferences and technology are constantly evolving.

For neophytes and fanatics The Miz, the touring production now at the Broward Center for the Performing Arts has much to offer in its treatment of the great classic novel by Victor Hugo about good and evil, love and loss to 19th-century France.

The magnificent Claude-Michel Sch? Nberg-Alain Boublil score (with lyrics in English, some goofy comedy, by Herbert Kretzmer) has been beautifully re-orchestrated by Chris Jahnke, Stephen Metcalfe and Stephen Brooker. All stunning and lighting design by Matt Kinley (which was inspired by the paintings of Victor Hugo) and Paule Constable is fluid and alive. Two scenes – the heroic Jean Valjean’s flight with the wounded Marius through the sewers and a jump emotionally ruin of Javert in the Seine – are breathtaking. And through the casting choices, the new The Miz has gotten a little more pop sensibility. This decision, however, give mixed results.

Near the opera in its scope and musical challenges, The Miz requires strong actors / singers, especially in the lead roles of Valjean, a man who served 19 years in prison after stealing a loaf of bread to feed the his sister’s starving family, and Javert, the lawman adamant that continues unabated and has changed the virtuous Valjean.

As Valjean, Lawrence Clayton offers a safe and dignified return of acting, but his pop and gospel-flavored – with the exception of the glorious, delicately nuanced take home – dulls what should be a central role. This tipped the balance in favor of Andrew Varela vocally dominant, work as commander of Javert in the first place on the beautiful Stars and ultimately the tragic Soliloquy. You’re not supposed to root for the villain in The Miz, but now you do.

Two performances of pop-style keys by women also produce mixed results. As the desperate Fantine, who turned to prostitution to support her daughter Cosette (Forrester Katherine softly), Betsy Morgan acts decently the musical history’s most tragic, but his voice rough edge drain the dramatic possibilities of I Dreamed a Dream and other DeathOn Fantine, Chasten Harmon is passionate and convincing as Eponine, the brave young woman who loves the student (Justin Scott Brown) Marius but loses the adult Cosette (Jenny Latimer). Harmon married a pop style musical theater to earth, providing wonderful versions of A Heart Full of Love (his heart-breaking trio with the beautiful-yet-bland Marius and Cosette) and On My Own.

Other players who earn their moments in the spotlight that is Michael Kostroff comic intrigues and evil Thenardier Colin DePaul that cheeky street kid Gavroche.

Directors Laurence Connor and James Powell were actually reworked The Miz in the new environment, even giving nods to famous plateau of the original with a few cases of small circular motion (if the plate was axed in overhaul). Both seem to have encouraged the bellowing and exaggeration

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