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House Of The Bulgarian Communist Party

December 12, 2012 by staff 

House Of The Bulgarian Communist Party, Sitting atop a mountain like an abandoned flying saucer, this giant structure looks like it was created on another planet. The House of the Bulgarian Communist Party was built in another era, however, one that long ago crumbled along with the way of life it embodied. After the fall of the Iron Curtain in 1989, Bulgaria moved into a new age of parliamentary democracy.

That left buildings like the House of the Bulgarian Communist Party, which perches at the top of Mount Buzludzha in the centre of the country, in a state of neglect.

It is one of a number of huge communist structures that many believe, if restored, could attract Western tourists to the region in their droves.

But the Bulgarian government does not have the resources to carry out the necessary extensive repair work, at an estimated cost of 30million leva (£12million), nor to pull them down.

Boycho Bivolarski, the BSP Socialist party chief from the nearby city of Stara Zagora, told AFP news agency: ‘This monument is unique in Europe and, if restored, it can attract tourists, especially Western, and bring money.’

Thieves have stripped much of the roof panelling away from the building, which opened in 1981, leaving it vulnerable to the elements.

A wall mosaic of Bulgaria’s communist dictator Todor Zhivkov has been destroyed, while others of communist heroes Marx, Engels and Lenin remain just about recognisable.

In a sign that many of the local population have no interest in such buildings, Prime Minister Boyko Borisov transfered ownership of the structure to the BSP Socialist party in November.

He said: ‘Let them take care of it if they’re so proud of it.’

The BSP Socialists have managed to secure the entrances to prevent would-be trespassers from entering.

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