GoDaddy Interfered With Domain Name Exodus Accuses Namecheap

December 27, 2011 by staff 

GoDaddy Interfered With Domain Name Exodus Accuses NamecheapGoDaddy Interfered With Domain Name Exodus Accuses Namecheap, An effort by GoDaddy customers to boycott the domain registrar over its support for Hollywood-backed copyright legislation has sparked allegations of foul play.

NameCheap, whose chief executive last week likened the Stop Online Piracy Act to “detonating a nuclear bomb” on the Internet, said today that GoDaddy has intentionally thrown up technical barriers to prevent its customers from leaving. It lost over 70,000 domains last week.

NameCheap has seized on a dispute over the Stop Online Piracy Act as a way to lure new customers.

It’s not alone: at least half a dozen GoDaddy rivals have seized on their competitor’s pro-SOPA lobbying to lure its customers away. NameCheap dubbed December 29 “move your domain” day, offering below-cost transfers with the coupon “SOPASUCKS” plus a $1 donation to the Electronic Frontier Foundation. Other registrars such as Dreamhost, HostGator, and, and have offered similar SOPA-related promotions.

“GoDaddy appears to be returning incomplete Whois information to Namecheap, delaying the transfer process” in violation of rules established by ICANN, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, NameCheap wrote in a blog post today. By this afternoon, the company said that GoDaddy had “finally unblocked our queries” and that transfers should now “go smoothly.”

For its part, GoDaddy, which has reportedly called customers to ask them to return, denies any wrongdoing. In a statement sent to CNET this afternoon, the company said:

Namecheap posted their accusations in a blog, but to the best our of knowledge, has yet to contact Go Daddy directly, which would be common practice for situations like this. Normally, the fellow registrar would make a request for us to remove the normal rate limiting block which is a standard practice used by Go Daddy, and many other registrars, to rate limit Whois queries to combat WhoIs abuse.

Because some registrars (and other data gathering,anlyzing and reporting entities) have legitimate need for heavy port 43 access, we routinely grant requests for expanded access per an SOP we’ve had in place for many years. Should we make contact with Namecheap, and learn they need similar access, we would treat that request similarly.

As a side note, we have seen some nefarious activity this weekend which came from non-registrar sources. But, that is not unusual for a holiday weekend, nor would it cause legitimate requests to be rejected. Nevertheless, we have now proactively removed the rate limit for Namecheap, as a courtesy, but it is important to point out, there still may be back-end IP addresses affiliated with Namecheap of which we are unaware. For complete resolution, we should be talking to each other — an effort we are initiating since they have not done so themselves.”

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