Effects Of Lightning Strike Difficulty With Short-term Memory Multitasking Irritability

January 19, 2012 by staff 

Effects Of Lightning Strike Difficulty With Short-term Memory Multitasking Irritability, Health Implications of Lightning Strike Victims
Who Gets Injured?
1/3 of injuries affect individuals during work.
1/3 of injuries affect individuals during recreational or sports activities.
1/3 of injuries affect individuals in a diverse situation, including those inside buildings.
How do Lightning Injuries Affect People?
Lightning tends to be a nervous system injury and may affect the brain, autonomic nervous system and the peripheral nervous system. When the brain is affected, the person often has difficulty with short-term memory, coding new information and accessing old information, multitasking, distractibility, irritability and personality change.

Symptoms of Lightning Strike Victims:
Intense headaches, ringing in the ears, dizziness.
Nausea and vomiting.
Dermatological symptoms including deep burns or superficial burns.
Eye injuries including cataracts, macular holes and retinal separation.
Difficulty sleeping or sleeping excessively at first and then only two or three hours at a time.
Seizure-like activity several weeks to months after the injury.
Personality changes due to frontal lobe damage. These include: irritability; anger; inability to express what is wrong with them; inability to recognize things; embarrassment for the inability to carry on a conversation, work at their previous job, or do the activities they used to handle. Many isolate themselves, withdrawing from family, friends and other activities.
Depression, which may result in suicide or resorting to alcohol and other drugs.
Fatigue after only a few hours of work.
Delayed problems including severe pain, especially in the back. This could lead to Sympathetically Mediated Pain Syndrome.
Decrease libido and impotence.

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