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Coney Island New York

August 28, 2011 by staff 

Coney Island New YorkConey Island New York, The National Hurricane Center in Miami says Irene lost hurricane strength and made landfall in Coney Island in New York.

Forecasters say Irene’s winds have dropped to 65 mph. They say that Irene should move to New England in the afternoon. Authorities also warned that isolated tornadoes are possible in the northeast along the morning.

Hurricane Irene became a tropical storm early Sunday as it landed in Coney Island in New York, with winds of 65 mph clock.

The real concern for officials is now a major flood in New York and the surrounding region. The storm pushed a surge 3 1/2-foot water in the port of New York. Forecasters said the summit could be twice as high later in the morning.

The north tube of the Holland Tunnel, which carries traffic from New York to New Jersey, was closed for a while due to flooding, but reopened in the morning.

Hurricane Irene became a tropical storm early Sunday as it landed in Coney Island in New York, with winds of 65 mph clock.

The real concern for officials is now a major flood in New York and the surrounding region. The storm pushed a surge 3 1/2-foot water in the port of New York. Forecasters said the summit could be twice as high later in the morning.

The north tube of the Holland Tunnel, which carries traffic from New York to New Jersey, was closed for a while due to flooding, but reopened in the morning.

The rains overflowed sewage and seawater licked the edges of sidewalks in the city of New York. Cascading water to Wall Street, which has a maze of wires and pipes under it and has been enriched with sandbags.

“I’ve never seen so, and have lived here 20 years,” said Charles Gunkel, a designer whose apartment is located in Stuyvesant Town, a sprawling residential complex of brick buildings, just east of the coast.

The storm that marched to the East Coast hit the region with torrential rains and strong winds and has been accused of at least 11 deaths and power outages affecting 3 million homes and businesses.

More than 2 million people along the East Coast had been warned or asked to flee path of the storm.

Irene had sustained winds near 75 mph when it made landfall second in two days, just before dawn Sunday near Little Egg inlet New Jersey. As the storm approached New York, the National Weather Service issued a tornado warning for the city and some surrounding counties until 11 am Irene arrived in New York at 9 am ET.

Flooding along the east coast and was causing major problems on Sunday.

“We have a lot of water. A ton of water. Most of the houses are islands,” said Rick Kelly, who stayed at his beachfront home in South Amityville, New York, despite orders evacuated because officials believed were too severe. “I’m not going to withdraw my ‘hype too much,” but it was a pretty good storm. ”

The flooding was worse than the winds of Irene, said Kelly, who was practically overnight. “You could hear little creaks and groans at home. Sometimes the rain,” he said. Space under your home is flooded and finally lost power at 3 am

In Philadelphia, parts of the city were flooded and the water was as high as the traffic signal levels in some areas. Flash Flood Warnings were issued up and down the eastern and central Pennsylvania.

Pennsylvania Governor Tom Corbett said: “The rivers may not crest until Tuesday or Wednesday It’s not just a 24-hour event ..”

Heavy rains and strong winds came to Rhode Island on Sunday morning, toppling trees and power lines, and leaving more than 100,000 homes without electricity. Wind gusts reached 45 mph and are expected to increase to 70 mph, according to Denis Riel, a spokesman for the Rhode Island National Guard.

In addition to strong winds, the storm is bringing heavy rains. Up to four inches of rain expected.

“We are being affected differently from North Carolina, but we still expect a major surge this afternoon,” said Melissa Cruz, spokeswoman for the city of Providence.

Providence Fox Point Hurricane Barrier, 25 meters, 3,000 meters long structure built in 1966 to prevent water damage to the city, was closed this morning. Before the barrier was built, downtown Providence was flooded with several feet of water during the hurricanes in 1938 and 1954.

In Delaware on Sunday morning, Irene left more than 10 inches of rain, making roads hazardous.

In Middlesex and Monmouth counties in New Jersey, a storm surge 4 to 6 feet above normal were expected Sunday morning, which is expected to cause tidal flooding near record.

Raritan River, which caused disastrous flooding after it was increased by rain from Hurricane Floyd 12 years ago, was not expected to crest until Sunday night.

“The flooding will be the biggest problem,” said New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie CNN.

Parts of Virginia reported up to 16 inches of rain, according to the National Weather Service. Areas of North Carolina reported up to 14 inches.

Irene could cost billions in storm surge flooding. CoreLogic, a research firm, estimates that in Virginia Beach, Atlantic City, Philadelphia, Washington, Boston, Providence, New York and Long Island and against 56.7 billion in residential combined storm surge damage when Irene comes as a Category 1 hurricane . These estimates do not include the rains and winds.

The storm also produced tornadoes Saturday in parts of Virginia, New Jersey and Delaware, where a tornado destroyed 15 buildings in the historic coastal town of Lewes.

Storm-related deaths, including two children, were registered in North Carolina, Florida, New Jersey and Virginia. In Goldsboro, NC, one died 4 years of age, when the car was crashed at an intersection where Irene knocked out power to traffic lights. And a 11-year-old died when a tree fell through his Newport News, Virginia, and apartment shortly after noon Saturday.

New York Metro Mass bus systems and have been closed since Saturday. In Boston, the transit authority said that public transport will be closed on Sunday.

Air traffic is committed to being raged for days in New York and Washington, DC, areas. More than 9,000 weekend flights were canceled. The area of ??New York City’s five main airports were closed.

So far, the wind and rain have knocked out power to at least 3 million customers in North Carolina, Virginia, Washington, DC, Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and New York.

Largest utilities in New York, Consolidated Edison, said it may cut power to the most vulnerable areas of the city if the storm caused severe flooding.

In Lusby, Maryland, Constellation Energy Group Nuclear, said one of the two nuclear reactors at Calvert Cliffs was off-line automatically due to strong winds from Hurricane Irene.

Constellation spokesman Mark Sullivan said the plant is safe and stable.

In Lacey, New Jersey, nuclear power plant Oyster Creek was taken offline, as a precaution, due to its proximity to Barnegat Bay, near the Atlantic Ocean.

Irene made his first landfall early Saturday at Cape Lookout, North Carolina ordered mandatory evacuations many governors, making it clear that those who remained would have to fend for themselves.

In New York on Sunday, officials were advising people to stay inside even though the storm had dropped and the rain had ceased.

“Many people think that the flood is over when the final storms,” ??said Michael Chertoff, former Secretary of Homeland Security. “The danger is not necessarily going to end today.”

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