Candice Bergen First Female Host Of Saturday Night Live

March 2, 2012 by staff 

Candice Bergen First Female Host Of Saturday Night Live, Candice Patricia Bergen (born May 9, 1946) is an American actress and former fashion model. She is known for starring in two TV series, as the title character on the situation comedy Murphy Brown (1988-1998), for which she won five Emmy Awards and two Golden Globe Awards; and as Shirley Schmidt on the comedy-drama Boston Legal (2004-2008), for which she was nominated for two Emmys, a Golden Globe, and a Screen Actors Guild Award.

She starred in several major films throughout the mid 1960s to early 1980s such as The Sand Pebbles, Carnal Knowledge, The Wind and the Lion, and Gandhi and received an Academy Award nomination for her role in Starting Over. Her later career includes character roles in Miss Congeniality and Sweet Home Alabama.

Bergen began appearing on her father’s radio program at a young age, and in 1958, at age eleven, with her father on Groucho Marx’s quiz show You Bet Your Life as Candy Bergen. She said that when she grew up she wanted to design clothes.

Bergen made her screen debut playing an aloof university student in The Group (1966), which delicately touched on the then-forbidden subject of lsbnism. Her second film in 1966 was The Sand Pebbles, in which she played Shirley Eckert, an assistant school teacher and missionary opposite Steve McQueen. The film was nominated for several Academy Awards.

After starring in the French film Live for Life (1967) and The Magus (1968) with Michael Caine and Anthony Quinn, she was featured in a 1970 political satire, The Adventurers, playing a frustrated socialite who has a lsbn affair. In 1975 she starred with Sean Connery in The Wind and the Lion, as a headstrong American widow kidnapped in Morocco in 1904 along with her two young children.

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