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Billy The Kid

June 26, 2011 by staff 

Billy The KidBilly The Kid, A retired Wichita industry that uses everything from Wild West memories of Picasso won the only surviving portrait of Billy the Kid logged with an offer and 2 million at auction in Denver.

The tintype was auctioned on Saturday night at the 22 Annual Brian Lebel Displays Old West & Auction. Organizers had estimated would fetch between 300,000 and 400,000 and $.

“I love the Old West,” said William Koch, 71, who now lives in Palm Beach, Florida, “My plan is to enjoy it and discreet to share. I think I’ll display it in a small museum.”

After winning the bid, Koch shook hands with Steve Upham, whose family owned the picture, and said, “I am glad that everyone benefited from it.”

Koch founded Oxbow Carbon, and with sales of 4 billion annually. His twin brother is David Koch, who, along with an older brother, Carlos, run energy giant Koch Industries. David and Carlos are prominent conservative activists and reportedly in the Vail area this weekend and received a six-month withdrawal conservative action.

William and a fourth brother, Federico, have sold their interests in the company.

Saturday night, William Koch left little doubt that would win the tintype as offering up some and 300,000 to 2 million and about two minutes.

Koch also must pay a buyer’s premium of the auction house about 10 percent, said Bob McCubbin, a collector of unseen photographs of the outlaws, Indians and lawmen, including Jesse James Garrett and Pat. It was predicted that the tintype would sell for more than 1 million.

“All you need is two serious bidders,” said McCubbin. “A billionaire has just passed.”

Koch has a large collection of western artifacts including handguns once owned by James and Frank James and a rifle that belonged to George Armstrong Custer. Koch, an avid sailor, he won the Copa America in 1992 with the yacht America, according to press reports.

Not all collections of Koch have made so happy. He has presented around eight lawsuits against people who sold 1,000 bottles of wine wrought among them four who allegedly once owned by Thomas Jefferson. One of the reasons he was pleased that Billy the Kid is the picture of the blessing of the auction house Christie.

McCubbin said tintype photograph is not very flattering for children, but that’s part of its fascination.

“This shows that the boy as he might have looked if we find him on the road between Lincoln and Fort Sumner, dressed in clothes he wore in the range, tangles with a hat he liked, well-worn boots, his rifle Winchester 1873 on hand, and his Colt Single Action in its holster on his right hip, “he said.

“It has been called the Holy Grail,” said Brian Lebel, who runs the auction of the old west. “It’s probably the most important historic photograph of one of the most infamous in the world.”

For year’s collectors believed that the original photograph, taken by a traveling photographer in 1879 or 1880 in Fort Sumner, New Mexico, no longer existed. Children posing in front of a saloon.

There were four original made simultaneously using a multi-lens camera. One burned in a fire. It is not known where two over.

The boy gave an auction on Saturday night one of his friend’s thief, Dan Dedrick. Dan gave his nephew Frank Upham in the 1930′s, McCubbin said.

The first time a copy of the photograph appeared in public was on January 8, 1881, in the news illustrated the Boston Police Department, according to McCubbin.

Pat Garrett used the image twice in his book “The authentic life of Billy the Kid,” McCubbin said. Sheriff Garrett Child fatally shot on July 14, 1881. The provenance is indisputable, he said.

Descendants Dedrick announced its existence in 1986 when he donated it to the Heritage Trust of Lincoln County, New Mexico. When the trust, the picture was back to the family Dedrick.

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