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Bald Barbie

January 23, 2012 by staff 

Bald Barbie, DO YOU THINK BARBIE SHOULD GO BALD?
Local residents answer via Facebook:
• “Sure! And maybe gain a few pounds not all in her breasts and behind.” — Maggie Skinner, Lafayette
• “Yes, she has represented many facets of society, why not cancer survivors and fighters? I think it would be great if Mattel would donate a portion of her purchase to cancer research. I can’t wait to see Barbie bald! I would consider purchasing her, in honor and memory of my family and friends who have fought the cancer battle.” — Michele White, West Lafayette
• “Seriously? I remember growing up, my sisters’ Barbie dolls were all in various stages of hair loss. Kids are quite capable of achieving this look (if they want) for their toys all by themselves.” — Gary Hall, Lafayette
• “Barbie is and has been an idol for girls. Only fitting they should be shown it’s beautiful to be what you are!” — Rachel Cripps, Lafayette
• “Some of us when we were little cut her hair off anyways. I think it’s a great idea. It will bring cancer knowledge to more people who don’t think about it every day unlike cancer patients do.” — Brenda Piatt, Rensselaer
• “Sure. It can help young girls to identify with something closer to what they look like and know that it is OK to be bald.” John Graves, Lafayette
• “Of course. Unfortunately, there are too many young girls suffering from cancer. They should be able to see the iconic Barbie look like them. I guess though it could be too close to home and make little girls not like it. They want to see what they should and will look like with hair. However, I think that should be the parent or child’s choice. So go for it!” — Jayna Best-Schenk, Lafayette

Seeing Aubrey Deno now, one would never suspect that she was diagnosed with leukemia in the summer of 2010. In remission from the cancer, the tiny tot is as rambunctious as they come, walking, running and climbing furniture even to the dismay of her parents.

“We are constantly laughing with her,” said her mother, Lacey Deno of Lafayette. “She’s definitely made up for lost time.”

At 2 years old, Aubrey is a fighter. She has received multiple rounds of chemotherapy and a bone marrow transplant. Though the first round of chemotherapy didn’t affect her, the second round did. She became sick, lacked energy and slept continuously. She even lost her hair.

So it’s no surprise that her parents, Dustin and Lacey Deno, are in support of the Facebook campaign urging toy-maker Mattel to create a bald Barbie. Rebecca Sypin of California and friend Jane Bingham of New Jersey started the campaign in late December to help inspire those who have lost their hair to cancer treatment, alopecia or other illnesses. Sypin is the mother of a 12-year-old daughter who is battling leukemia and Bingham has lymphoma, according to the Los Angeles Times.

Mattel issued a response to the campaign: “We are honored that Jane Bingham and Beckie Sypin believe that Barbie could be the face of such an important cause. Mattel appreciates and respects the passion that has been built up for the request for a bald Barbie doll. We are constantly exploring new and different dolls to be added to our line; and as you might imagine, we receive hundreds of passionate requests for various dolls to be added to our collection.”

Whether the toy giant will create a Beautiful and Bald Barbie at the request of more than 100,000 fans who “like” the page remains to be seen.

Richard Feinberg, consumer psychologist at Purdue University, said creating a bald Barbie would be a positive move for Mattel.

“Companies are looking for a way to tie into prominent social campaigns or themes,” Feinberg said. “It doesn’t hurt Mattel’s image in any way.”

Seeing Aubrey Deno now, one would never suspect that she was diagnosed with leukemia in the summer of 2010. In remission from the cancer, the tiny tot is as rambunctious as they come, walking, running and climbing furniture even to the dismay of her parents.

“We are constantly laughing with her,” said her mother, Lacey Deno of Lafayette. “She’s definitely made up for lost time.”

At 2 years old, Aubrey is a fighter. She has received multiple rounds of chemotherapy and a bone marrow transplant. Though the first round of chemotherapy didn’t affect her, the second round did. She became sick, lacked energy and slept continuously. She even lost her hair.

So it’s no surprise that her parents, Dustin and Lacey Deno, are in support of the Facebook campaign urging toy-maker Mattel to create a bald Barbie. Rebecca Sypin of California and friend Jane Bingham of New Jersey started the campaign in late December to help inspire those who have lost their hair to cancer treatment, alopecia or other illnesses. Sypin is the mother of a 12-year-old daughter who is battling leukemia and Bingham has lymphoma, according to the Los Angeles Times.

Mattel issued a response to the campaign: “We are honored that Jane Bingham and Beckie Sypin believe that Barbie could be the face of such an important cause. Mattel appreciates and respects the passion that has been built up for the request for a bald Barbie doll. We are constantly exploring new and different dolls to be added to our line; and as you might imagine, we receive hundreds of passionate requests for various dolls to be added to our collection.”

Whether the toy giant will create a Beautiful and Bald Barbie at the request of more than 100,000 fans who “like” the page remains to be seen.

Richard Feinberg, consumer psychologist at Purdue University, said creating a bald Barbie would be a positive move for Mattel.

“Companies are looking for a way to tie into prominent social campaigns or themes,” Feinberg said. “It doesn’t hurt Mattel’s image in any way.”

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